St Bride's: Music - Lunchtime Recitals

Mervyn Hogg - organ

Friday, 29 May at 1:15pm - FREE ADMITTANCE - Retiring Collection

Mervyn Hogg - organ

Reger

      from twelve pieces Op. 59

          IX  Benedictus  

Parry                                                       

      Toccata and Fugue (The Wanderer)      

Widor

      from Symphony 2 in D major Op. 13        

          IV Salve Regina

Alain

      Litanies  

Mervyn Hogg has enjoyed a 'hobby career' as a Church musician and organist for many years in parallel to his career as a research scientist and business manager. From early days of playing for the daily school assembly at the Latymer School, Edmonton he progressed to be Organist and then Choirmaster at the Mary Harris Memorial Chapel, Exeter University during 1969-1971. Subsequently he moved to Cardiff where he became a member of the music team at St German's Roath. In 1977 he moved to Ruislip and became Director of Music at St Martin's Ruislip, a post he held from 1978-1998.  Since 1998 whilst still enjoying an association with that church he has continued to serve various churches as a freelance musician and given recitals in the UK and Barbados.  He is convenor for the St Paul's Diocesan Choir. He has been award diplomas in organ performance from Trinity College- London. 

 

During 2014 he received  his MA(Music) with  Merit from the Open University featuring a dissertation on the influence of Vatican Regulation on the Music of Westminster Cathedral and also a project concerning the evolution of published editions of Bach's Orgelbüchlein which  was published as a paper in Organist Review (March  2014). Last year he gave a recital on Armistice Day of music conceived in Germany, France, Russia and the UK during 1914 which illustrated the differing emotions ranging from imperialistic confidence to terror, dread and prayerfulness felt by composers at that time.

 

Today's programme explores some fine examples of music from the romantic era of the late 19th early 20th century and ends with the 'fireworks' of Alain's Litanies first published in 1937.