St Bride's: Music - Lunchtime Recitals

Edward Hughes - tenor, and William Vann - piano

Tuesday, 21 March at 1:15pm - FREE ADMITTANCE - Retiring Collection

Edward Hughes - tenor, and William Vann - pianoEdward Hughes - tenor, and William Vann - piano

Schumann

Dichterliebe op.48

Wagner

Siegfried WWV 86C

Act 1 - 'Nothung, nothung neidliches Schwert'

Narration

Act 2 - 'Dass der mein Vater nicht ist'

Narration

Act 3 - 'Selige Ode auf wonnige Höh!'

Dichterliebe - Schumann

1. Im wunderschönen Monat Mai - In beautiful May, when the buds sprang, love sprang up in my heart: in beautiful May, when the birds all sang, I told you my desire and longing.

2. Aus meinen Tränen sprießen - Many flowers spring up from my tears, and a nightingale choir from my sighs: If you love me, I'll pick them all for you, and the nightingale will sing at your window.

3. Die Rose, die Lilie, die Taube, die Sonne - I used to love the rose, lily, dove and sun, joyfully: now I love only the little, the fine, the pure, the One: you yourself are the source of them all.

4. Wenn ich in deine Augen seh - When I look in your eyes all my pain and woe fades: when I kiss your mouth I become whole: when I recline on your breast I am filled with heavenly joy: and when you say, 'I love you', I weep bitterly.

5. Ich will meine Seele tauchen - I want to bathe my soul in the chalice of the lily, and the lily, ringing, will breathe a song of my beloved. The song will tremble and quiver, like the kiss of her mouth which in a wondrous moment she gave me.

6. Im Rhein, im heiligen Strome - In the Rhine, in the sacred stream, great holy Cologne with its great cathedral is reflected. In it there is a face painted on golden leather, which has shone into the confusion of my life. Flowers and cherubs float about Our Lady: the eyes, lips and cheeks are just like those of my beloved.

7. Ich grolle nicht - I do not chide you, though my heart breaks, love ever lost to me! Though you shine in a field of diamonds, no ray falls into your heart's darkness. I have long known it: I saw the night in your heart, I saw the serpent that devours it: I saw, my love, how empty you are.

8. Und wüßten's die Blumen, die kleinen - If the little flowers only knew how deeply my heart is wounded, they would weep with me to heal my suffering, and the nightingales would sing to cheer me, and even the starlets would drop from the sky to speak consolation to me: but they can't know, for only One knows, and it is she that has torn my heart asunder.

9. Das ist ein Flöten und Geigen - There is a blaring of flutes and violins and trumpets, for they are dancing the wedding-dance of my best-beloved. There is a thunder and booming of kettle-drums and shawms. In between, you can hear the good cupids sobbing and moaning.

10. Hör' ich das Liedchen klingen - When I hear that song which my love once sang, my breast bursts with wild affliction. Dark longing drives me to the forest hills, where my too-great woe pours out in tears.

11. Ein Jüngling liebt ein Mädchen - A youth loved a maiden who chose another: the other loved another girl, and married her. The maiden married, from spite, the first and best man that she met with: the youth was sickened at it. It's the old story, and it's always new: and the one whom she turns aside, she breaks his heart in two.

12. Am leuchtenden Sommermorgen - On a sunny summer morning I went out into the garden: the flowers were talking and whispering, but I was silent. They looked at me with pity, and said, 'Don't be cruel to our sister, you sad, death-pale man.'

13. Ich hab' im Traum geweinet - I wept in my dream, for I dreamt you were in your grave: I woke, and tears ran down my cheeks. I wept in my dreams, thinking you had abandoned me: I woke, and cried long and bitterly. I wept in my dream, dreaming you were still good to me: I woke, and even then my floods of tears poured forth.

14. Allnächtlich im Traume - I see you every night in dreams, and see you greet me friendly, and crying out loudly I throw myself at your sweet feet. You look at me sorrowfully and shake your fair head: from your eyes trickle the pearly tear-drops. You say a gentle word to me and give me a sprig of cypress: I awake, and there is no sprig, and I have forgotten what the word was.

15. Aus alten Märchen winkt es - The old fairy tales tell of a magic land where great flowers shine in the golden evening light, where trees speak and sing like a choir, and springs make music to dance to, and songs of love are sung such as you have never heard, till wondrous sweet longing infatuates you! Oh, could I only go there, and free my heart, and let go of all pain, and be blessed! Ah! I often see that land of joys in dreams: then comes the morning sun, and it vanishes like smoke.

16. Die alten, bösen Lieder - The old bad songs, and the angry, bitter dreams, let us now bury them, bring a large coffin. I shall put very much therein, I shall not yet say what: the coffin must be bigger than the 'Tun' at Heidelberg. And bring a bier of stout, thick planks, they must be longer than the Bridge at Mainz. And bring me too twelve giants, who must be mightier than the Saint Christopher in the cathedral at Cologne. They must carry the coffin and throw it in the sea, because a coffin that large needs a large grave to put it in. Do you know why the coffin must be so big and heavy? I will also put my love and my suffering into it.

 

Siegfried - Wagner

Act 1
Nothung, Nothung, sword of necessity, what mighty blow must have broken you?
I've filed your shattered, shining blade to splinters and now I heat them in the fire
Heigh Ho! Blow bellows, blow the fire!

In the wild woods stood a tree that I chopped down, that brown ash tree I burnt to charcoal and now I have tossed the pieces in the fireplace.

The charcoal burns bravely, how bright and fairly it glows, the sparks fly happily from the fire. Heigh Ho! Reforging the blade again.

Act 2
That dwarf isn't my father, that fills me with me with joy. Now, for the first time, I feel all the freshness of the outdoors and am cheered by the happy day that I discover I never have to see that gastly being.

How did my father look then? Ha! Like me of course! If Mime had a son then he'd obviously look like him...grim, gastly and grey...small and hunched....with hanging ears...treacherous, piercing eyes...away with the beast...I never want to see him again!

But...what did my mother look like? I have no idea. Perhaps she had the kind, glittering eyes of a roedeer? But surely even more lovely! She gave birth to me, but why did she have to die in doing so? Do all mortal mothers die in childbirth? That would be so sad, if so. But THIS son wants, more than anything, to see his mother. His mother, the mortal woman.

Act 3
Serene calm on these mountains.

What lies there sleeping in the shade? A steed? Deep in sleep. What's flashing over there? What is that glittering steel? Is the glare of the fire still impairing my vision? Shining armour? Should I approach it? Oh, it's a man in armour. The sight of him is strangely comforting. His head seems a bit squashed into the helmet. Surely he'd sleep better if I loosened it. Wow, how beautiful! Shimmering clouds encircle us in splendour in the heavenly sky. Sunlight seems to stream from his face and pierce the clouds above. His chest is weighed down with armour. Shall I unfasten that too? Come, my sword, cut through the chords.

THAT'S NO MAN!

Burning enchantment seers through my heart, fiery fear fills my eyes, my senses swoon and swim. Who on earth can I call to help me?! Mother. MOTHER! HELP ME!

How can I wake this maiden? So that she opens her eyes to me? Perhaps the sight of her eyes will terrify me further? Do I dare? Can I bear the sight? I sway and stagger, I am not myself. Painful longing scorches through my senses. On my beating heart trembles my hand.

Have I become a coward? Is this the fear that I have never felt before? Mother, your previously valiant child is freaking out at the mere sight of a sleeping woman. She has taught me to fear. How do I rid myself of this fear? How do I regain my courage? Of course, to awaken myself, I must awaken her.

Her sweetly trembling, flowerlike mouth eases my fear. Her warm breath has a lovely smell. Wake up! WAKE UP! Heavenly woman!

She can't hear me?! I should draw her life from her sweet lips but doing so may well kill me.

Edward Hughes studied at the Benjamin Britten International Opera School with Tim Evans-Jones after he had completed an MEng in Aeronautical Engineering at Imperial College London.  He has covered at the Royal Opera House and Opera North and sung roles at Opera Holland Park and Longborough Festival Opera.  He has sung as a concert soloist with the LPO, Royal Choral Society and at the Berlin Philharmonie and the Cadogan Hall.  He also sings in the Royal Hospital Chamber Choir and has been a workshop leader for Opera Holland Park's INSPIRE programme.  His recent studies have been sponsored by the Wagner Society and the Mastersingers and this recital is the culmination of a sponsored role study of Siegfried.

William Vann studied piano accompaniment at the Royal Academy of Music with Malcolm Martineau and Colin Stone. He has recently been made an Associate of the RAM. He has been awarded many prizes for piano accompaniment, including the Wigmore Song Competition Jean Meikle Prize for a Duo, the Gerald Moore award, the Royal Overseas League Accompanists' Award, a Geoffrey Parsons Memorial Trust award, the Sir Henry Richardson Scholarship and the Hodgson Fellowship in piano accompaniment at the RAM. His discography includes recordings with Albion Records, Champs Hill Records and SOMM. He is a Trustee of the Ralph Vaughan Williams Society, a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists and a conductor and vocal coach on the Dartington and Oxenfoord International Summer Schools. He is also the Director of Music at the Royal Hospital, Chelsea, where he directs the choir and a programme of concerts in the Royal Hospital's Wren Chapel, and the founder and Artistic Director of the London English Song Festival, now in its sixth season.

Edward Hughes studied at the Benjamin Britten International Opera School with Tim Evans-Jones after he had completed an MEng in Aeronautical Engineering at Imperial College London.  He has covered at the Royal Opera House and Opera North and sung roles at Opera Holland Park and Longborough Festival Opera.  He has sung as a concert soloist with the LPO, Royal Choral Society and at the Berlin Philharmonie and the Cadogan Hall.  He also sings in the Royal Hospital Chamber Choir and has been a workshop leader for Opera Holland Park's INSPIRE programme.  His recent studies have been sponsored by the Wagner Society and the Mastersingers and this recital is the culmination of a sponsored role study of Siegfried.

William Vann studied piano accompaniment at the Royal Academy of Music with Malcolm Martineau and Colin Stone. He has recently been made an Associate of the RAM. He has been awarded many prizes for piano accompaniment, including the Wigmore Song Competition Jean Meikle Prize for a Duo, the Gerald Moore award, the Royal Overseas League Accompanists' Award, a Geoffrey Parsons Memorial Trust award, the Sir Henry Richardson Scholarship and the Hodgson Fellowship in piano accompaniment at the RAM. His discography includes recordings with Albion Records, Champs Hill Records and SOMM. He is a Trustee of the Ralph Vaughan Williams Society, a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists and a conductor and vocal coach on the Dartington and Oxenfoord International Summer Schools. He is also the Director of Music at the Royal Hospital, Chelsea, where he directs the choir and a programme of concerts in the Royal Hospital's Wren Chapel, and the founder and Artistic Director of the London English Song Festival, now in its sixth season.