St Bride's: Music - Palisander

St Bride's: Music - Lunchtime Recitals

Palisander

Friday, 8 March at 1:15pm - FREE ADMITTANCE - Retiring Collection

Palisander

Lydia Gosnell, Miriam Monaghan, Caoimhe de Paor and Elspeth Robertson - recorders

Antidotum Arachne
16th and 17th-century victims of venomous spider bites were offered no medicinal cure or relief. Instead the local musicians would work together to find the correct melody, known as a 'tarantella', which could cure them of their otherwise fatal symptoms.

Recorded by Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680) - Antidotum

Tarquinio Merula (1595-1665) - Canzon Seconda 'La Lusignola'

Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) arr. Miriam Monaghan
La Notte (The Nightmare Concerto) RV 439 - (Largo) - Allegro - Largo - Allegro

Maddalena Casulana (c.1544- c.1590) - Il Vostro Dipartir

Cipriano de Rore (c.1515-1565) - Anchor che col partire
(with diminutions by Riccardo Rognioni c.1550-1620)

Tarantellas II - arr. Miriam Monaghan
[Sources: La Carpinese - Athansius Kircher - from Magnes siue de arte magnetica (Rome, 1641); Tarantella Del Gargano - Traditional Apulian Melody; (Ground Bass) La Tarantelas - Santiago de Murcia; From The Saldivar Codex no. 4 (Madrid, c.1732); Tiburtio Massaino (c.1550-1608); Ego pro te rogavi Petre]

Agnes Dorwarth  (b. 1953) - Articulator V

William Byrd (1540-1623) - In Fields Abroad

Tarantellas I - arr. Miriam Monaghan
[Sources: Tarantella Napoletana - Athanasius Kircher; From Magnes siue de arte magnetica (Rome, 1641); Tarantelas - Santiago de Murcia; From the Saldivar Codex No. 4 (Madrid, c.1732); Tarantella Italiana - Recorded by Francisco Xavier Cid; From Tarantisimo Observado... (Madrid, 1787)]

"The Tarantula: A small venomous insect or spider ... whose sting makes men very drowsy, unconscious, and can be fatal. The tarantula is so called after Taranto, a town in Apulia, Italy, where they can be found in great numbers. Many people believe that the Tarantula's venom changes in quality from day to day, or from hour to hour, for it induces great diversity of passions in those who are stung: some sing; others laugh; others weep; others again cry out unceasingly; some sleep whilst others are unable to sleep; some vomit or sweat, or tremble; others fall into continual terrors, frenzies, rages and furies. It has been said since time immemorial that music can cure the tarantula's poison, since it awakens the spirits of the afflicted person."
- Dictionnaire Universel, Antonio Furetiere 1690.

In the midst of Renaissance advancements, the 17th Century saw Galileo discovering Saturn's rings, Stradivari crafting his first violin, and Monteverdi composing L'Orfeo. At a time where human knowledge and understanding of the world around them was developing with increasing speed, the continued belief in curing spider bites with music seems all the more extraordinary.

Tarantism was a hysterical disorder believed to be the result of a tarantula's bite. It had a sovereign cure: music. According to folklore, the single method of survival once bitten was to expel the spider's poison through sweat, by dancing a tarantella: a frantic dance that could last for hours, if not days at a time. Tarantellas originate from the Apulia region of southern Italy, an area long associated with magic, music and dance. Palisander's programme is an exploration into the world of tarantism: it includes music reflecting the wide-ranging symptoms experienced by those suffering a venomous spider bite and reconstructions of the curative melodies recorded by Early Modern Men of Science, used to treat them.

Palisander prides itself on presenting imaginative, historical programmes with a wide range of repertoire; performing largely from memory, on recorders up to 6 feet tall. Comprised of alumni from the Guildhall School of Music & Drama and Royal College of Music, Palisander has quickly established itself as a vibrant young ensemble: 'Palisander's imaginative performance really helped them to stand out from the crowd; they carefully thought through their... seamless entertaining programme, which they delivered with great panache and which resulted in tremendous enthusiasm and cheers from the crowd.'
- Clare Norburn, Brighton Early Music Festival.

In November, Palisander won the inaugural Early Music Young Ensemble Competition, at the London International Exhibition of Early Music. The group is delighted to be one of two groups selected for the prestigious Emerging European Ensembles Scheme 2019. In 2016, Palisander was selected for the St John's Smith Square Young Artists' Scheme. The previous year, Palisander took part in the Brighton Early Music Festival's 'Early Music Live!' scheme: 'the leading training and apprenticeship scheme for young early music ensembles'. The group is excited to have been chosen as Making Music UK Selected Artists 2018-2019. Winners of the June Emerson Launchpad Prize for chamber groups, Palisander has performed at the London Festival of Baroque Music, Newbury Spring Festival and Cheltenham Music Festival, as well as for London Fashion Week. Next year, with support from the Tunnell Trust, Palisander will give a concert tour in Scotland, encompassing the Isle of Skye and Isle of Eigg. The quartet's international performances include Italy, Japan, Russia and several performances in France, as part of La Folle Journée Festivals. Palisander has featured on radio, including BBC Radio 3.

Palisander's debut album, Beware the Spider! was released in 2017 and received a 4 star review from BBC Music Magazine. The disc features music from today's concert programme. In addition, Robert Hugill said 'This charming disc not only shows off the ensemble's skills admirably, but provides a programme which intrigues'. Classic FM featured a live performance film of one of the pieces on the album, which has received over 4.6 million views so far!

Palisander enjoys giving regular family concerts and workshops. This includes working for the prestigious Live Music Now scheme, founded by Yehudi Menuhin and previously, being featured artists in the Wigmore Hall's Chamber Tots series. Palisander collaborated with puppet theatre company Rust and Stardust Productions, to develop a unique family show - Dr Dee's Daughter and the Philosopher's Stone - which is supported by Arts Council England and has had performances across the country, including Lake District Summer Music, Beverley Early Music Festival and Wiltshire Music Centre. The group has recently been awarded another ACE grant to tour its educational project Recorder Revolution! which will bring inspiring, interactive performances to schools across England.

Palisander prides itself on presenting imaginative, historical programmes with a wide range of repertoire; performing largely from memory, on recorders up to 6 feet tall. The quartet is delighted to have been selected for the prestigious Emerging European Ensembles Scheme 2019 and in 2016, the group was selected as St John's Smith Square Young Artists. The quartet has performed at the London International Early Music Exhibition, Newbury Spring Festival and Cheltenham Music Festival, as well as London Fashion Week. Palisander's international performances include festivals in France, Japan and Russia. Palisander has featured on radio, including BBC Radio 3. The quartet's debut album, Beware the Spider! was released last year and received a 4 star review from BBC Music Magazine.