St Bride's: News

Reg Frary Memorial

On Thursday 31st March 2011 at 3:30pm a service of thanksgiving was held at St Bride's for the life of Reg Frary, writer, author, and proofreader, and lover of church choral music.

The BIDDING PRAYER

The Venerable David Meara delivered the Bidding:

Reg Frary, whom we gather to remember today, was something of a legend. For the past twenty years he worked for Taylor Wessing as a proof reader; known as the godfather of good grammar, he was also grandfather to the firm.

Reg loved the written word and was himself an accomplished writer and published author. But his great passion was for music and singing and churches. His love of singing went back to the 1950s when he used to offer his services as an itinerant singer to church choirs around the country, and over the years it has grown and developed.

We remember Reg today as a wise and loving man, a friend to many, and a faithful Christian pilgrim, and as we give thanks for the privilege of having known him, so we commend him to the love and mercy of his heavenly Father. May celestial music be his eternal joy and delight, and may his soul rest in peace.

AMEN.

ADDRESSES

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Linda Hewitt
Rev Jonathan Croucher

READINGS

Heather Prior, read Isaiah, 35
Tim Eyles, read One Day When I Was Young by Reg Frary
Clare Ferguson, read Psalm 24

MUSIC

The choir & organist of St Bride's Choir performed the following anthems and songs:

Lord, Who May Dwell In Your Sanctuary - Matthew Morley
Arise, Shine - Sir George Elvey
God So Loved The World - Stainer
Glorious Is Thy Name - Mozart
Simple Gifts - trad. arr. Bob Chilcott

Hymns:
Guide me, O thou great Redeemer
Praise, my soul, the King of Heaven
Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord

OBITUARIES & COMMENT

The Lawyer

Anglican Society for the Welfare of Animals

BBC Interview with Reg, aged 90

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"Back Page - Frary: godfather of grammar"
The Lawyer, 5 April 2010


Reg's thoughts on celestial choirs:-

When I was a choirboy and took the words of some of our great Christian hymns more literally I often used to wonder about those heavenly choirs, so often referred to, who sing gloriously day and night for ever and ever.

In our choir, particularly on cold, soaking wet, November Sunday evenings when the organist was rapidly growing purple in the face because the organ was 'acting up' once again, the vicar had changed the tune of his favourite hymn, half the choirboys were absent with very sudden colds or queasy stomachs and the bass who always sang half a tone below everyone else was on absolutely buoyant form, we had an awful job just getting through an hour of choral evensong, let alone singing celestially ad infinitum ....

From What a Performance

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